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Secular Humanism, Gnosticism, Christianity, and Buddhism

I. Write an essay/paper, of at least two parts, that focuses on at least two cosmological/praxial themes and which cover at least two or more of the meta-cosmologies we have covered so far. These include Secular Humanism, Gnosticism, Christianity, and Buddhism. Your book Forbidden Faith discusses Zoroastrianism. Each part should include some description, comparison, and contrast of the traditions covered.
Always keep in mind the themes of self-transcendence, as well as that of central and peripheral consciousness! Be accurate and creative!
As you write your paper, show awareness of considerations such as those expressed in the following questions. Fit answers to as many of these and related questions as you can into your essay/paper:
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What is cosmology in the philosophical sense? What is philosophy in the sense that we are using the word ‘philosophy’ in class? How does self-transcendence fit in?
What is cosmology in the broad sense? In general, how do philosophy (= love of wisdom), religion, and ideology fit within the cosmological-praxial framework? Bring in a discussion of the neutrality of this framework with respect to physicality, spirituality, and scope.
What is wijdān / phenomenological experience? Why is it important?
What reason did the ancient Church use to justify the position that seeking knowledge in matters of faith is heretical? Give the full context and apply the spectrum of true belief.
What do mainstream Pauline Christianity and Gnosticism have in common? How do they differ?
What are some fundamental “equations” of Christianity? of Buddhism? Compare and contrast them!
What is scientism? What is fideism? In terms of cosmological commitment: What do they share in common? Why is this matter so important?
In the current zeitgeist, religion is considered in opposition to reason or rationalism. What is wrong with this view?
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II. Solve the following and append these to the back of your essay/paper:
Cosmology in the physical sense is primarily interested in the (universe * world).
Cosmology in the philosophical sense is primarily interested in the (universe * world).
Cosmology in the physical sense is primarily interested in (meaning * function * value).
The (macrocosm * microcosm) is a domain of the (universe * world).
The cosmos (outside * within) us constitutes the (macrocosm * microcosm).
According to (Gnosticism * Christianity * Secular Humanism) “salvation” (or the fulfillment of humanity) depends upon (faith * knowledge) per se.
According to (Gnosticism * Christianity * Secular Humanism) “salvation” (or the fulfillment / good of humanity) lies in the world (above * below).
Faith, in principle, involves things that one (cannot * does not) know to be true.
Faith, in principle, (is * is not) restricted in subject matter or scope.
Truth (is * is not) independent of knowledge.
A given proposition (can * cannot) be known to be true by one person and knownto be false by another person.
Certainty involves belief that one (knows * does not know) to be true.
Certitude may involve belief that one (does * does not) know to be true.
One may have (certainty * certitude) of a (true * false) proposition.
Certainty involves belief that one (knows * does not know) to be true.
Certitude may involve belief that one (does * does not) know to be true.
The spectrum of true belief (is * is not) neutral with respect to subject matter (i.e., scope).
The spectrum of true belief (is * is not) neutral with respect to physicality and spirituality (i.e., domain).
With respect to (cosmological meditation * praxial spirit), the philosophical roots of Christianity are (pronomian * antinomian * theological * anti-theological).
With respect to (cosmological meditation * praxial spirit), the philosophical roots of Buddhism are (pronomian * antinomian * theological * anti-theological).
Faith(Chr) is a function of (certitude * certainty * asceticism * antinomianism).
The praxial spirit of (Judaism * Christianity * Islam) is antinomian.
The cosmological spirit of (Judaism * Christianity * Islam) is Abrahamic.
For the Sophists, ethical values are ( * not) defined in terms of the will of a critical mass or majority of some society.
For the Philosophers, ethical values are ( * not) defined in terms of the will of a critical mass or majority of some society.
In (Philosophy * Sophistry) (truth * power) is emphasized over (truth * power).
(Intrinsic * Instrumental) value is (logically * temporally) prior to (intrinsic * instrumental) value.
(Intrinsic * Instrumental) value is (logically * temporally) posterior to (intrinsic * instrumental) value.
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Working on these questions will help you to anchor your thoughts as you structure your paper. My advice is to thoughtfully, carefully, and fully answer the questions above first. Then integrate your answers into a single paper and apply as much as you can. If you like, you can submit your answers to the questions as a separate and distinct appendix to the back of your paper.
I uploaded a text that might help.
If the instructions are not clear, please, don’t hesitate to ask me.